Articles Multiple rescues for Exmouth RNLI

Multiple rescues for Exmouth RNLI

Multiple rescues for Exmouth RNLI

On what was one of their busiest days of the year, volunteer RNLI crew members attended several emergencies today in and off the Exmouth coastline.

At 10:08hrs today H.M. Coastguard tasked our RNLI Inshore Lifeboat, D-755 Peggy D to a report of a female and a dog on a paddle board seen apparently drifting out of control off the coast at Budleigh Salterton. The lifeboat was launched immediately by tractor driver Neil Cannon, and volunteer shore crew Scott Ranft, Rory Carrig and Ed Steele, under the supervision of Head Launcher, John Dinsdale.

The lifeboat, under the command of Helm, Roger Jackson and crew Andrew Stott and Harry Griffin, sped to the last reported location of the casualty and discovered her nearly 2 miles out to sea. Both the casualty and her dog, who were uninjured, were taken aboard the life saving vessel and to the safety of land at Budleigh Salterton.

          Exmouth Inshore Lifeboat launches to the rescue  Credit : John Thorogood / Exmouth RNLI

The female was given suitable safety advice by Exmouth Coastguard who were at the scene having themselves been alerted to the incident.

The inshore lifeboat returned to Exmouth RNLI station and was back on service at 11:00 hrs today.

At 12:30 hrs H.M. Coastguard alerted Exmouth RNLI to a sighting of two females in an inflatable dinghy seemingly out of control and drifting out to sea off Budleigh Salterton together with a paddleboarder who was attempting to rescue them.

Our RNLI inshore lifeboat Peggy D was launched immediately by tractor driver Neil Cannon, and volunteer shore crew Scott Ranft, Rory Carrig and Andrew Stott, under the guidance of Head Launcher, John Dinsdale.

The inshore lifeboat was manned by RNLI volunteers, under the command of Helm, Harry Griffin and crew James Edge and Ed Steele, and made its way rapidly to the location of the last sighting of the two individuals. Once on scene, it was established that the dinghy had been caught by the wind and tide and disappeared out to sea.

The lifeboat commenced a comprehensive search pattern of the area and located the two casualties about twenty minutes later, 1.6 miles out to sea and out of control. They were taken on board the lifeboat and conveyed to Budleigh Salterton where they were seen by members of Exmouth Coastguard who gave appropriate safety advice. Neither suffered any injuries.

At 13:19 hrs, whilst on route back to Exmouth lifeboat station, the crew were tasked to two further emergencies involving a kayak and a paddleboard off Sidmouth. Sidmouth Lifeboat and Exmouth Coastguard also assisted in these tasks.

Once on scene at 13:35hrs, it was ascertained that both incidents had been resolved and no further assistance was necessary. The lifeboat returned to Exmouth where it was back on service at 14:00hrs today.

Inshore Lifeboat Helm, Harry Griffin, said “There was a strong offshore breeze off our coastline today and this undoubtedly contributed to the emergencies we attended. It was very fortunate that none of the incidents resulted in more serious consequences and we were able to get to the casualties in good time. Nevertheless, these serve as a timely reminder to all water users to take note of relevant safety advice concerning winds, tides and currents in the area, to use vessels that are suitable for taking to the sea and to be kitted with proper safety and communications equipment at all times when on the water.”

Exmouth RNLI would like to congratulate Ed Steele on what was his first live emergency call today as a volunteer crew member.

RNLI Safety advice concerning paddle boarding can be found at : https://rnli.org/safety/choose-your-activity/stand-up-paddle-boarding

Similar safety advice regarding canoeing and kayaking can be found here : https://rnli.org/safety/choose-your-activity/kayaking-and-canoeing

Author: John Thorogood

John Thorogood

John is the Exmouth Lifeboat Press Officer & Fundraising Press Officer, covering operations, fundraising and events to help save lives at sea.